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Breon S. Peace’s practice focuses on white-collar defense, regulatory enforcement matters and complex civil litigation.

On November 29, 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ” or the “Department”) announced a new FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy (the “Enforcement Policy”) applicable to investigations of companies under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”). The Enforcement Policy builds on the FCPA Pilot Program (the “Pilot Program”) that has been in effect since April 2016, and provides additional transparency regarding the credit the Department will provide to companies that self-report FCPA violations and then cooperate with the resulting investigation. By and large, the new policy, which is now part of the U.S. Attorney’s Manual (“USAM”), makes key provisions of the Pilot Program permanent, and significantly, it also promises additionalbenefits to companies that qualify. The Enforcement Policy signals a further effort by DOJ to encourage companies to self-report and cooperate, although the policy also leaves the Department with considerable leeway in assessing key threshold questions for eligibility even for companies that do self-report.

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In a September 25, 2017 speech in New York, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (the “CFTC”) Division of Enforcement (the “Division”) Director James McDonald outlined the CFTC’s focus on creating greater incentives for self-reporting and cooperation in order to deter and detect misconduct in the commodities markets. Director McDonald’s speech accompanied the release of an Updated Advisory on Self Reporting and Full Cooperation, which supplements the guidance issued by the CFTC earlier this year.

The new guidance reflects an effort by the CFTC to rebalance the incentives facing firms who identify potential misconduct to favor voluntary reporting and pro-active cooperation, reinforced by the potential for concrete benefits in the form of fine reductions and, potentially, declination of prosecution in appropriate cases. Commodities market participants and financial institutions should take note of this guidance when considering how to respond to potential evidence of misconduct and in dealing with the Division.

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